Who Are the Jesuits?

Let’s hear from the famous personalities of the ages.

John Adams

“My history of the Jesuits is not eloquently written, but it is supported by unquestionable authorities, [and] is very particular and very horrible. Their [the Jesuit Order’s] restoration [in 1814 by Pope Pius VII] is indeed a step toward darkness, cruelty, despotism, [and] death. … I do not like the appearance of the Jesuits. If ever there was a body of men who merited eternal damnation on earth and in hell, it is this Society of [Ignatius de] Loyola.” (John Adams, 2nd President of the United States)

 

Abraham Lincoln

“This [American Civil] war [of 1861-1865] would never have been possible without the sinister influence of the Jesuits. We owe it to popery that we now see our land reddened with the blood of her noblest sons. Though there were great differences of opinion between the South and the North on the question of slavery, neither Jeff Davis [President of the Confederacy] nor anyone of the leading men of the Confederacy would have dared to attack the North, had they not relied on the promises of the Jesuits, that under the mask of Democracy, the money and arms of the Roman Catholic, even the arms of France, were at their disposal if they would attack us. I pity the priests, the bishops and monks of Rome in the United States, when the people realize that they are, in great part, responsible for the tears and the blood shed in this war. I conceal what I know on that subject from the knowledge of the nation, for if the people knew the whole truth, this war would turn into a religious war, and it would at once take a tenfold more savage and bloody character. It would become merciless as all religious wars are. It would become a war of extermination on both sides.” (Abraham Lincoln, 16th President of the United States.)

 

Robert Southey

“A Jesuit may be shortly described as an empty suit of clothes with another person living in them, who acts for him, thinks for him, decides for him whether he shall be a prince or a beggar, and moves him about wheresoever he pleases; who allows him to exhibit the internal aspect of a man, but leaves him none of the privileges – no liberty, no property, no affections, not even the power to refuse obedience when ordered to commit the most atrocious of crimes; for, the more he outrages his own feelings, the greater his merits. Obedience to the superior is his only idea of virtue, and in all other respects he is a mere image.” (Robert Southey, was an English poet of the Romantic school.)

 

Samuel Morse

“They are Jesuits. This [Roman Catholic] society of men, after exerting their tyranny for upwards of two hundred years, at length became so formidable to the world, threatening the entire subversion to all social order, that even the Pope [i.e., Clement XIV], whose devoted subjects they [i.e., the Jesuits] are, and must be, by the vow of their society, was compelled to dissolve them [in 1773]. They had not been suppressed, however, for fifty years, before the waning influence of Popery and Despotism required their useful labors to resist the light of Democratic liberty, and the Pope (Pius VII) simultaneously with the formation of the Holy Alliance [in Europe], revived the order of the Jesuits in all their power.

And do Americans need to be told what Jesuits are? If any are ignorant, let them inform themselves of their history without delay; no time is to be lost; their workings are before you in every day’s events; they are a secret society, a sort of Masonic order with super added features of revolting odiousness, and a thousand times more dangerous. They are not merely priests, or priests of one religious creed; they are merchants, and lawyers, and editors, and men of any profession, having no outward badge (in this country [i.e., the USA]) by which to be recognized; they are about in all your society. They can assume any character, that of angels of light, or ministers of darkness, to accomplish their one great end, the service upon which they are sent, whatever that service may be.” (Samuel Finley Breese Morse, was an American contributor to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system.)

 

Napoleon Bonaparte

“The Jesuits are a MILITARY organization, not a religious order. Their chief is a general of an army, not the mere father abbot of a monastery. And the aim of this organization is power – power in its most despotic exercise – absolute power, universal power, power to control the world by the volition of a single man [i.e., the Black Pope, the Superior General of the Jesuits]. Jesuitism is the most absolute of despotisms [sic] – and at the same time the greatest and most enormous of abuses…” – Napoleon Bonaparte, French Emperor

James Parton

“If you trace up Masonry, through all its Orders, till you come to the grand tip-top head Mason of the World, you will discover that the dread individual and the Chief of the Society of Jesus [i.e., the Superior General of the Jesuit Order] are one and the same person.” (James Parton, American historian)

 

 

 

Andrea Duphin

“The Jesuits are a naked sword, whose hilt is at Rome but its blade is everywhere, invisible until its stroke is felt.” -Andre Duphin, (a French advocate, president of the chamber of deputies and of the Legislative Assembly.)

 

 

 

Clement XIV

“Alas, I knew they [i.e., the Jesuits] would poison me; but I did not expect to die in so slow and cruel a manner.” (Clement XIV, Roman Catholic Pope)

 

 

 

 

 

also called "Novalis"

“Never before in the course of the world’s history had such a Society [i.e., the Jesuit Order] appeared. The old Roman Senate itself did not lay schemes for world domination with greater certainty of success.” (Friedrich von Hardenberg, an author and philosopher of early German Romanticism.)

 

 

 

Marquis de Lafayette

“It is my opinion that if the liberties of this country – the United States of America – are destroyed, it will be by the subtlety of the Roman Catholic Jesuit priests, for they are the most crafty, dangerous enemies to civil and religious liberty. They have instigated MOST of the wars of Europe.” (Gilbert du Motier, marquis de Lafayette – French aristocrat and military officer.)

 

 

Hector Carsewell Macpherson

“They [i.e., the Jesuits] have so constantly mixed themselves up in court and state intrigues that they must, in justice, be reproached with striving after world dominion. They cost kings their lives, not on the scaffold, but by assassination, and equally hurtful as the society of Illuminati; they were the foremost among the crowd, at all events, who applauded the murder scenes in Paris [during the French Revolution].” (Hector C. Macpherson, a prolific Scottish writer and journalist.)

 

Adolf Hitler

“Above all I have learned from the Jesuits. And so did Lenin too, as far as I recall. The world has never known anything quite so splendid as the hierarchical structure of the [Roman] Catholic Church. There were quite a few things I simply appropriated from the Jesuits for the use of the [Nazi] Party.

“I have learnt most of all from the Jesuit Order. …So far, there has been nothing more imposing on earth than the hierarchical organization of the [Roman] Catholic Church. A good part of that organization I have transported direct to my own [Nazi] party. …The Catholic Church must be held up as an example. …I will tell you a secret. I am founding an order.  _ (Adolf Hitler, Nazi Leader)

Lord Palmerston

“The presence of the Jesuits in any country, Romanist [i.e., Catholic] or Protestant, is likely to breed social disturbance.” (Henry John Temple, 3rd Viscount Palmerston, a British statesman who served twice as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom in the mid-19th century.)

 

 

 

 

J.A. Wylie

“There was no disguise they (the Jesuits) could not assume, and therefore, there was no place into which they could not penetrate. They could enter unheard the closet of the Monarch, or the Cabinet of the Statesman. They could sit unseen in convocation or General Assembly, and mingle unsuspected in the deliberations and debates.

There was no tongue they could not speak, and no creed they could not profess, and thus there was no people among whom they might not sojourn, and no church whose membership they might not enter and whose functions they might not discharge. The could execrate [i.e., sharply denounce] the Pope with the Lutheran, and swear the Solemn League with the Covenanter.” (James Aitken Wylie, a Scottish historian of religion and Presbyterian minister.)

 

Advertisements

3 comments on “Who Are the Jesuits?

  1. Very interesteing. I’ve just begun to see the Jesuit influence. Could you site your sources for these quotes? The quote attributed to James Parton above is misleading. Parton, in his book, “The Life of Horace Greeley”, is paraphrasing what was the general anti-masonic sentiment in the north during Civil War times. He later stated that he considered this and other ‘conspiracy’ ideas about masons, “…ridiculous”.
    I think when dealing with this type of info we need to be more thorough.

    • Ok… lets try to review his book, where accordingly, Parton considered these conspiracies as ridiculous. He said;

      I have been tempted to use the word ridiculous in connection with this affair; and looking back upon it, at the distance of a quarter of a century, ridiculous seems a proper word to apply to it.

      Yes! Parton commented in this way. But as we continue reading, we will see those things that you neglected.

      I have been tempted to use the word ridiculous in connection with this affair; and looking back upon it, at the distance of a quarter of a century, ridiculous seems a proper word to apply to it. But it did not seem ridiculous then. It had, at least, a serious side.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s